Problem of Practice – CEP 817

Online Learning

Currently, I’m a member of the LMS/Online Advisory Committee at the college and often the topic of student retention comes up in conversation. Student retention is not only important in courses that are taught on campus in a traditional classroom, but also in the online environment as well. It seems that retention in online courses is an ongoing issue and we have yet to find a single viable solution. Is it the technology, the instructor, the teaching method, the student, the course? The list of questions goes on.

For some time now, I have been interested in exploring different ways to improve student retention in online courses so I thought this would be a great opportunity and an ideal problem of practice to explore. The Web Programming curriculum at the college where I teach is taught entirely online but I am going to focus on a single 8-week “Introduction to Web Programming” course (ITWP 1000) within the curriculum. This is a core introductory course within the program and is also a course that is required in many of the other IT programs at the college as well. I typically run 4 sections of the ITWP 1000 course in the Fall and Winter semesters at the college with full enrollment (26-28 students).

I have noticed that within the first week of the course; typically anywhere from 1-5 students drop the course and half way through, additional students may drop or withdraw from the course. For example, a course that begins with 26 enrolled students may end with only 18 and out of the 18, only 15 may have earned a passing grade. Unfortunately, I have no way of knowing the reason a student may drop or withdraw from a course unless the student chooses to share it with me and on occasion some students do. Time commitment, health issues, a family emergency, and finances are some of the reasons that students choose to share. Those types of issues are part of life of which we can’t control, but what about other issues such as their comfort level with technology and computers, reliable Internet access, course workload, lack of confidence, lack of motivation, or not understanding the course material? All of these are obstacles that may inhibit success.

Target Audience and Preliminary Thoughts

The students are going to be the primary target audience during my exploration into improving student retention in online courses (ITWP 1000) but I am very interested in the thoughts and opinions of my colleagues as well so they will play an additional role in my research. Some preliminary ideas of exploration (there may be more) include examining the following:

  • The use of “how-to” videos or video instruction within the course at crucial points.
  • The idea of hosting a “meet and greet the instructor” session online during the first few days of the online class.
  • The idea of hosting online sessions for some of the discussion forum activities for the course.
  • The use of online “tutoring” sessions and what technology could be used to accomplish it.
  • Establishing online office hours specifically for online students.
  • The idea of hosting 2-3 half hour (approximately) on campus sessions during the first few days of class where students can drop in to watch me demonstrate how to set up a connection to the web server and then attempt it themselves with me standing by if they need assistance.
  • The use of video conferencing software for student interaction.
  • Establishing common obstacles that may get in the way of success.

I’m very excited to dive into and explore the issues and obstacles surrounding the student retention rate in the ITWP 1000 course that I teach and the possible solution(s) to increasing student retention in the course.

References:

SpliteShire. (2014, August). [Computer/Communication] [Image]. Retrieved from https://pixabay.com/en/macbook-notebook-apple-device-407127/

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